Stephen Peters

Stephen Peters

Lecturer of Finance

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Contact

450 Wohlers Hall

1206 S. Sixth

Champaign, IL 61820

217-265-0276

pete@illinois.edu

Vita

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Educational Background

  • PhD, Finance, Indiana University, 1994
  • BS, Finance, University of Nebraska, 1988

Positions Held

  • Lecturer, University of Illinois, 2012 to present
  • Assistant Professor, Kansas State University, 2002-2007
  • Assistant Professor, University of Cincinnati, 2000-2002
  • Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Illinois, 1998-2000,2007-2012
  • Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut, 1994-1998
  • Instructor, Indiana University, 1993-1994
  • Associate Instructor, Indiana University, 1988-1993

Recent Publications

  • Peters, S., & Longhofer, S. Forthcoming. Self-Selection and Discrimination in Credit Markets. Real Estate Economics, 33 (2),

Other Publications

Article

  • Peters, S., & Longhofer, S. (2005). Protection for Whom? Regulation, 28 (4),
  • Peters, S., & Longhofer, S. (2004). Protection for Whom? Creditor Conflict and Bankruptcy. American Law & Economic Review, 6 (2),
  • Peters, S. (2002). Mortgage Scoring Models and the Myth of Overrides. Federal Reserve System Credit Scoring Committee, (5),
  • Peters, S., Schmid Klein, L., & O'Brien, T. (2002). Debt vs. Equity and Asymmetric Information: A Review. Financial Review, 37 (3),
  • Peters, S., & Ferguson, M. (2000). Is Lending Discrimination Always Costly. Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, 21 (1),
  • Peters, S., & Longhofer, S. (1999). Why is Mortgage Discrimination Illegal? A Fresh Look at the Mortgage Discrimination Debate. Regulation, 22 (4),
  • Peters, S., & Longhofer, S. (1998). Beneath the Rhetoric: Clarifying the Debate on Mortgage Lending Discrimination. Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, 34 (4),
  • Peters, S., & Ferguson, M. (1997). Cultural Affinity and Lending Discrimination: The Impact of Underwriting Errors and Credit Risk Distribution on Applicant Denial Rates. Journal of Financial Services Research, 11 (1/2),
  • Peters, S., & Ferguson, M. (1995). What Constitutes Evidence of Discrimination in Lending? Journal of Finance, 50 (2),

Presentation

  • Peters, S. (2003). Self-Selection and Discrimination in Credit Markets. Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics.
  • Peters, S., & Longhofer, S. (2003). Self-Selection and Discrimination in Credit Markets. Retail Credit Conference-BANFF.
  • Peters, S., & Longhofer, S. (2002). Protection for Whom? Creditor Conflicts and Bankruptcy. Financial Management Association.
  • Peters, S., & Longhofer, S. (2002). Protection for Whom? Creditor Conflicts and Bankruptcy. Financial Management Association.
  • Peters, S. (1999). But I Know It When I See It: An Economic Analysis of Vague Rules. Econometric Society Winter Meetings.
  • Peters, S. (1999). Protection for Whom? Creditor Conflicts and Bankruptcy. Colorado Summer Finance Conference.
  • Peters, S. (1999). Protection for Whom? Creditor Conflicts and Bankruptcy. Colorado Summer Finance Conference.
  • Peters, S. (1998). Is Lending Discrimination Always Costly? American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association.
  • Peters, S. (1998). Self-Selection and Discrimination in Credit Markets. American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association.
  • Peters, S. (1996). A Symmetric-Information Model of Credit Rationing. European Finance Association.
  • Peters, S. (1996). But I Know It When I See It: Asymmetric Information, Reputation, and Vague Rules in the Regulation of Financial Markets. Western Finance Association.
  • Peters, S. (1996). Cultural Affinity and Lending Discrimination: The Impact of Underwriting Errors and Credit Risk Distribution on Applicant Denial Rates. Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  • Peters, S. (1995). A Rationale for the Functional Separation of Qualitative Asset Transformation Services in Banking. Western Finance Association.
  • Peters, S. (1995). Loan Denial and Default Rates: What Can They Tell Us About Lending Discrimination? Eastern Finance Association.
  • Peters, S. (1993). Why are Demand Deposits Sequentially-Service-Constrained and Insured? Journal of Financial Intermediation Symposium on Globalization & the Reform of Financial Institution.
  • Peters, S. (1991). The Role of Inside Collateral in Reducing Agency Costs. Eastern Finance Association.

Working Paper

  • Peters, S. (2014). Discrimination & Favoritism in Professional Sports.".
  • Peters, S. (2014). Theory & Evidence of 'Fair-Weather Fans' in Professional Sports,".
  • Peters, S. (2013). Dinner Table Finance," book outline and partial manuscript.
  • Peters, S. (2012). The Trouble with Anti-Discrimination Laws.

Grants

  • Summer Research Grant, Center for Real Estate and Urban Economic Studies, 1997,1998
  • CIBER Dissertation Grant, Indiana University, 1993

Current Courses

  • Advanced Corporate Finance (FIN 321) Theories of firms' investment and financing decisions are covered. Topics include dividend policy, capital budgeting, capital structure, bankruptcy, long- term debt and leasing decisions.
  • Cases in Corporate Finance (FIN 422) Course totally devoted to the study of financial management cases, provides students a hands-on learning experience. The case work helps students to develop their analytical and interpretative skills in solving unstructured real world problems. The theoretical concepts and tools learned in the introductory finance courses provide the foundation for the case studies. Topics discussed include financial forecasting and working capital management; capital budgeting and cost of capital; and capital structure, dividend policy, corporate financing, financial restructuring, financial distress, mergers, acquisitions and firm valuation. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit.
  • Mergers and Acquisition (FIN 424) Focuses on identifying ways to increase firm value through mergers and acquisitions (M&A) and corporate restructurings. Surveys the drivers of success (failure) in M&A transactions and develop your skills in the design and evaluation of transactions. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit.
  • Investments (FIN 511) Introduction to investment analysis, including the theory and implementation of portfolio theory; empirical evidence on the performance of financial assets; evaluation of portfolio investment strategies; and the extension of diversification to international markets.

Contact

450 Wohlers Hall

1206 S. Sixth

Champaign, IL 61820

217-265-0276

pete@illinois.edu

Vita