Michael Williamson

Michael Williamson

A.C. Littleton Professor of Accountancy

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Contact

291 Wohlers Hall

1206 S. Sixth

Champaign, IL 61820

217-300-3337

migwilli@illinois.edu

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Educational Background

  • Ph.D., Accounting, Indiana University, 2005
  • Master of Business, Indiana University, 2003
  • Master of Information Systems, Public Policy and Management, Carnegie Mellon University, 1998
  • B.S., Accounting, Louisiana State University, 1996

Positions Held

  • Associate Head, Department of Accountancy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2017-2019
  • Director, Ph.D. Program, Department of Accountancy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2015-2017
  • A.C. Littleton Professor of Accountancy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2015 to present
  • Professor of Accountancy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2015 to present
  • Graduate School of Business and Economics Extramural Fellow, Maastricht University, 2014-2018
  • Associate Professor of Accounting (EY Faculty Fellow), University of Texas at Austin, 2011-2015
  • Assistant Professor, University of Texas at Austin, 2005-2011
  • Senior Consultant (Information Technology), Ernst & Young, 1998-2000
  • Tax Consultant, Ernst & Young, 1997

Recent Publications

  • Kachelmeier, S., Wang, L., & Williamson, M. (2019). Incentivizing the Creative Process: From Initial Quantity to Eventual Creativity. The Accounting Review, 94 (2), 249-266.
  • Brueggen, A., Feichter, C., & Williamson, M. (2018). Motivating Performance on Routine Tasks to Inspire Creativity: The Role of Management Control Systems. The Accounting Review, 29-43.
  • Bruggen, A., Feichter, C., & Williamson, M. (2018). The Effect of Input and Output Targets for Routine Tasks on Creative Task Performance. The Accounting Review, 93 (1), 29-43.
  • Kachelmeier, S., Thornock, T., & Williamson, M. (2016). Communicated Values as Informal Controls: Promoting Quality While Undermining Productivity. Contemporary Accounting Research, 33 1411-1434.

Other Publications

Articles

  • Fisher, J., Peffer, S., Sprinkle, G., & Williamson, M. (2015). Performance Target Levels and Effort: Reciprocity across Single and Repeated-Interaction Settings. Journal of Management Accounting Research, (2), 145-164.
  • Hales, J., Wang, L., & Williamson, M. (2015). Selection Benefits of Stock-Based Compensation for-the Rank-and-File Employees. The Accounting Review, 90 1497-1516.
  • Kachelmeier, S., Majors, T., & Williamson, M. (2014). Does Intent Modify Risk-Based Auditing? The Accounting Review, 89 (6), 2181-2201.
  • Williamson, M., Webb, A., & Zhang, Y. (2013). Productivity-Target Difficulty, Target-Based Pay and Outside-the-box Thinking. The Accounting Review, 88 (4), 1433-1457.
  • Dikolli, S., Evans, J., Hales, J., Matejka, M., Moser, D., & Williamson, M. (2013). Testing Analytical Models Using Archival or Experimental Methods. Accounting Horizons, 27 129-139.
  • Williamson, M., Chen, C., & Zhou, H. (2012). Reward System Design and Group Creativity: An Experimental Investigation. The Accounting Review, 87 1885-1911.
  • Balakrishnan, R., Sprinkle, G., & Williamson, M. (2011). Contracting Benefits of Corporate Giving: An Experimental Investigation. The Accounting Review, 86 1887-1907.
  • Hales, J., & Williamson, M. (2010). Implicit Employment Contracts: The Limits of Management Reputation for Promoting Firm Productivity. Journal of Accounting Research, 48 51-80.
  • Kachelmeier, S., & Williamson, M. (2010). Attracting Creativity: The Initial and Aggregate Effects of Contract Section on Creativity-Weighted Productivity. The Accounting Review, 85 1669-1691.
  • Koonce, L., Williamson, M., & Winchel, J. (2010). Consensus Information and Nonprofessional Investors' Reaction to the Relation of Estimate Inaccuracies. The Accounting Review, 85 979-1000.
  • Sprinkle, G., Williamson, M., & Upton, D. (2008). The Effort and Risk-Taking Effect of Budget-Based Contracts. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 33 436-452.
  • Williamson, M. (2008). The Effects of Expanding Employee Decision Making on Contributions to Firm Value in an Informal Reward Setting. Contemporary Accounting Research, 25 1183-1209.
  • Williamson, M., Kachelmeier, S., & Reichert, B. (2008). Measuring and Motivating Quantity, Creativity, or Both. Journal of Accounting Research, 46 341-373.
  • Sprinkle, G., & Williamson, M. (2004). The Evolution from Taylorism to Employee Gainsharing: A Case Study Examining John Deere's Continuous Improvement Pay Plan. Issues in Accounting Education, 19 487-503.

Book Chapters

  • Sprinkle, G., & Williamson, M., Chris Chapman, Anthony Hopwood, and Mike Shields (Ed.) (2007). Experimental Research in Managerial Accounting. Handbook of Management Accounting Research The Netherlands: Elsevier Science.

Working Papers

  • Fanning, K., Williams, J., & Williamson, M. Group Recruiting Events and Gender Stereotypes in Employee Selection.

Honors and Awards

  • List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent by Their Students (2016, 2017, and 2019 Ranked as Outstanding) University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019

Service

  • Editor of a Journal, The Accounting Review, 2017 to present
  • Editor of a Journal, Accounting, Organizations and Society, 2016-2017
  • Editorial Board Member, The Accounting Review, 2011-2017
  • Editor of a Journal, Journal of Management Accounting Research, 2013-2016

Courses

  • Decision Making for Atg (ACCY 302) Decision making implications of information provided to organization managers and to external stakeholders such as investors, creditors, customers, and regulators. Concepts from economics, statistics, and psychology emphasize the use of quantitative techniques to comprehend uncertainty and risk. Projects, together with a series of practical workshops, facilitate self-discovery of knowledge and development of a variety of professional skills and attitudes.
  • Managerial Accounting (ACCY 503) Introduction to management accounting as part of the firm's information system, in terms of modern cost accounting and budgetary systems for planning and controlling business operations. 2 or 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. May be repeated up to 4 hours for iMSA and online students that complete the first part of the course content in a 2-hour section (part A) and then complete the remainder of the class in a second 2-hour section (part B).
  • Special Research Problems (ACCY 593) Individual investigations or research projects selected by the students, subject to approval by the graduate adviser and the executive officer of the Department. May be repeated in the same or separate terms.

Contact

291 Wohlers Hall

1206 S. Sixth

Champaign, IL 61820

217-300-3337

migwilli@illinois.edu

Vita

Google Scholar

SSRN