Jialan Wang

Jialan Wang

Assistant Professor of Finance

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Contact

470D Wohlers Hall

1206 S. Sixth

Champaign, IL 61820

217-300-4697

jialanw@illinois.edu

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Educational Background

  • Ph.D., Financial Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2010
  • B.S., Mathematics, California Institute of Technology, 2003

Positions Held

  • Assistant Professor of Finance, Finance, University of Illinois, 2016 to present
  • Visiting Assistant Professor, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, 2014
  • Economist, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, 2012-2016
  • Assistant Professor of Finance, Olin Business School Washington University in St. Louis, 2010-2012

Recent Publications

  • Wang, J., & Keys, B. (2019). Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards. Journal of Financial Economics,.

Other Publications

Article

  • Wang, J., Gross, T., Swanson, A., & Allen, H. (2017). Early Medicaid Expansion Reduced Payday Borrowing Among Low-Income Adults in California. Health Affairs, 36(10).
  • Wang, J., Notowidigdo, M., & Gross, T. (2014). Liquidity Constraints and Consumer Bankruptcy: Evidence from Tax Rebates. Review of Economics and Statistics, (3), 96(3).
  • Wang, J., Graff-Zivin, J., & Azoulay, P. (2010). Superstar Extinction. Quarterly Journal of Economics,.
  • Wang, J., Lerner, J., & Schoar, A. (2008). Secrets of the Academy: The Drivers of University Endowment Success. Journal of Economic Perspectives,.
  • Wang, J., Wilke, C., Ofria, C., Lenski, R., & Adami, C. (2001). Evolution of Digital Organisms at High Mutation Rates Leads to Survival of the Flattest. Nature,.

Other Publication

  • Wang, J., Burke, K., Lanning, J., & Leary, J. (2014). CFPB Data Point: Payday Lending.
  • Wang, J. (2013). Payday Loans and Deposit Advance Products: A White Paper of Initial Data Findings.

Presentation

  • Wang, J. (2019). When Is It Hard to Make Ends Meet? Boston College seminar.
  • Wang, J. (2019). The Economic Consequences of Bankruptcy Reform. AEA Annual Meeting.
  • Wang, J. (2018). Information Disclosure and Payday Lending in Texas. SFS Cavalcade.
  • Wang, J. (2018). The Marginal Propensity to Consume Over the Business Cycle. SFS Cavalcade.
  • Wang, J. (2017). When Is It Hard to Make Ends Meet? NBER Summer Institute 2017 Household Finance.
  • Wang, J. (2017). When Is It Hard to Make Ends Meet? SFS Cavalcade.
  • Wang, J. (2017). The Marginal Propensity to Consume Over the Business Cycle. Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Management.
  • Wang, J. (2017). The Marginal Propensity to Consume Over the Business Cycle. CFIC.
  • Wang, J. (2017). The Marginal Propensity to Consume Over the Business Cycle. MFA Conference in Chicago.

Working Paper

  • Wang, J., & Skimmyhorn, W. Forthcoming (2021). The Effect of Government Pensions on Labor Supply, Savings, and Financial Well-Being.
  • Wang, J., & Baugh, B. (2019). When Is It Hard to Make Ends Meet?
  • Wang, J., & Leary, J. (2019). Liquidity Constraints and Budgeting Mistakes: Evidence from Social Security Recipients.
  • Wang, J., Burke, K., & Leary, J. (2019). Information Disclosure and Payday Lending in Texas.
  • Wang, J., Gross, T., Kluender, R., Liu, F., & Notowidigdo, M. (2019). The Economic Consequences of Bankruptcy Reform.
  • Wang, J., Gross, T., & Deshpande, M. (2017). The Effect of Government Cash Assistance on Household Financial Outcomes.
  • Wang, J., Gross, T., & Notowidigdo, M. (2016). The Marginal Propensity to Consume Over the Business Cycle.

Grants

  • The Effect of Government Pensions on Labor Supply, Savings, and Financial Well-Being, National Bureau of Economic Research - Retirement and Disability Research Consortium, 2018-2019
  • The Effect of Government Pensions on Labor Supply, Savings, and Financial Well-Being, Retirement Research Consortium, 2018-2018
  • NBER Disability Research Center grant-“The Effect of Government Cash Assistance on Household Financial Outcomes”, National Bureau of Economic Research, 2017
  • The Effect of Government Pensions on Labor Supply, Savings, and Financial Well-Being, TIAA Institute & Pension Research Council, 2017
  • NBER Disability Research Center grant-“The Effect of Government Cash Assistance on Household Financial Outcomes”, National Bureau of Economic Research, 2016
  • NBER Household Finance small grant-“The Effect of Government Cash Assistance on Household Financial Outcomes”, National Bureau of Economic Research, 2016
  • NBER Retirement Research Center grant-"Social Security Benefits and Household Budgeting", National Bureau of Economic Research, 2016
  • Washington Center for Equitable Growth-“The Effect of Government Cash Assistance on Household Financial Outcomes”, Equitable Growth, 2016

Research Interests

Household Finance, Fintech, Behavioral Economics

Current Courses

  • Personal Wealth Management (FIN 435) Studies personal wealth management techniques with an emphasis on life insurance products; covers life insurance policies, annuities, trusts, buy-sell arrangements, investing in stocks, bonds and mutual funds, banking and barrowing, purchasing residential and commercial real estate, income and estate taxation and management of personal financial portfolio. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit.
  • Fin Tech (FIN 490) 1 to 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated in the same term to a maximum of 6 hours. May be repeated in subsequent terms to a maximum of 9 hours. Course will not satisfy Finance major requirements.
  • Retirement Policy (FIN 571) The retirement landscape in the US - including public policy, retirement plan design, and individual behavior - is constantly changing and evolving. This course will examine the economic, financial, legal, regulatory, political, and human resource issues involved with designing and implement both public and private retirement plans, including Social Security, pensions and retirement savings plans. Credit is not given for both FIN 434 and FIN 571.
  • Fin Tech (FIN 580) Approved for letter and S/U grading. May be repeated to a maximum of 18 hours in a semester; may be repeated to a maximum of 32 hours in subsequent semesters.

Contact

470D Wohlers Hall

1206 S. Sixth

Champaign, IL 61820

217-300-4697

jialanw@illinois.edu

Vita

Google Scholar

Homepage